Members' books

The Anthology of Australian Prose Poetry

Prose poetry is a resurgent literary form in the English-speaking world and has been rapidly gaining popularity in Australia. Cassandra Atherton and Paul Hetherington have gathered a broad and representative selection of the best Australian prose poems written over the last fifty years.

Ceremony Men Making Ethnography and the Return of the Strehlow Collection

By analyzing one of the world’s greatest collections of Indigenous song, myth, and ceremony—the collections of linguist/anthropologist T. G. H. Strehlow—Ceremony Men demonstrates how inextricably intertwined ethnographic collections can become in complex historical and social relations. In revealing his process to return an anthropological collection to Aboriginal communities in remote central Australia, Jason M. Gibson highlights the importance of personal rapport and collaborations in ethnographic exchange, both past and present, and demonstrates the ongoing importance of sociality, relationship, and orality when Indigenous peoples encounter museum collections today.

Albert “Pompey” Austin: A man between two worlds

On the take.

On The Take - The 1910 scandal that changed Australian football forever - shines a light on footy’s first major scandal, when one of the VFL’s earliest superstars—Carlton’s Alex ‘Bongo’ Lang, a three-time Premiership hero—experienced a sudden and unexpected fall from grace when he was convicted by the League of taking a bribe to play ‘dead’ in the semi-final of 1910. In thrilling detail, it presents 1910 as arguably the single most turbulent season in VFL/AFL history, contextualising it within the League’s wider development in the formative phase between establishment in 1897 and the outbreak of the First World War.

The coverpage of The Great War book

The Great War: Aftermath and Commemoration

In this book, leading historians reflect on the commemorative splurge, which involved large amounts of public spending, and also re-examine what happened in the immediate aftermath of the war itself.

White Women, Aboriginal Missions and Australian Settler Governments: Maternal Contradictions

In White Women, Aboriginal Missions and Australian Settler Governments, Joanna Cruickshank and Patricia Grimshaw provide the first detailed study of the central part that white women played in missions to Aboriginal people in Australia.

Meeting the Waylo: Aboriginal Encounters in the Archipelago

Meeting the Waylo is a history of story-making about the experiences of Migeo, Boongaree and Bundle, three Indigenous Australians who were intermediaries on board maritime expeditions in the early nineteenth century. These Indigenous men travelled to the archipelagos of the north-west of Western Australia, where they became central figures in encounters between the crew and local Indigenous groups onshore.

Book cover of Refugees and the Promise of Asylum in Postwar France 1945-1995

Refugees and the Promise of Asylum in Postwar France, 1945–1995

This book recounts France’s responses to refugees from the liberation of Paris in 1944 to the end of the civil wars in the former Yugoslavia in 1995.

Aboriginal People and Australian Football in the Nineteenth Century: They Did Not Come from Nowhere

This book will revolutionise the history of Indigenous involvement in Australian football in the second half of the nineteenth century.

Historians at the Frankfurt Auschwitz Trial: Their Role as Expert Witnesses

The Frankfurt Auschwitz trial was a milestone event in West German history. Between 1963 and 1965, twenty-two former Auschwitz personnel were tried in Frankfurt am Main.

The Limits of Life Writing

In the age of social media, life writing is ubiquitous. But if life writing is now almost universal—engaged with on our phones; reported in our news; the generator of capital, no less—then what are the limits of life writing?

Moonlight on Oleander: Prose Poems

Paul Hetherington has become a master of the prose poem form, creating intriguing yet hospitable pieces whose tonal, emotional and imaginative range are a delight.

Remembering Independence

Remembering Independence explores the commemoration and remembrance of independence following the great wave of decolonisation after the Second World War.

The Unfinished Atomic Bomb: Shadows and Reflections

This book is testament to the ways in which contemplations of the A-bomb are endlessly shifting, rarely fixed on the same point or perspective.

Brokers and Boundaries: Colonial Exploration in Indigenous Territory

Colonial exploration continues, all too often, to be rendered as heroic narratives of solitary, intrepid explorers and adventurers. This edited collection contributes to scholarship that is challenging that persistent mythology. With a focus on Indigenous brokers, such as guides, assistants and mediators, it highlights the ways in which nineteenth-century exploration in Australia and New Guinea was a collective and socially complex enterprise. Many of the authors provide biographically rich studies that carefully examine and speculate about Indigenous brokers’ motivations, commitments and desires. All of the chapters in the collection are attentive to the specific local circumstances as well as broader colonial contexts in which exploration and encounters occurred.

She Woke & Rose

The poems in this impressive debut collection illuminate the uneasy space of the body, the tomb of emotional memory, the ugliness of misogyny, the abyss of consumerism and the violent desire for communion.

Remembering Genocide

In Remembering Genocide an international group of scholars draw on current research from a range of disciplines to explore how communities throughout the world remember genocide. Whether coming to terms with atrocities committed in Namibia and Rwanda, Australia, Canada, the Punjab, Armenia, Cambodia and during the Holocaust, those seeking to remember genocide are confronted with numerous challenges. Survivors grapple with the possibility, or even the desirability, of recalling painful memories. Societies where genocide has been perpetrated find it difficult to engage with an uncomfortable historical legacy. Still, to forget genocide, as this volume edited by Nigel Eltringham and Pam Maclean shows, is not an option. To do so reinforces the vulnerability of groups whose very existence remains in jeopardy and denies them the possibility of bringing perpetrators to justice. Contributors discuss how genocide is represented in media including literature, memorial books, film and audiovisual testimony. Debates surrounding the role museums and monuments play in constructing and transmitting memory are highlighted. Finally, authors engage with controversies arising from attempts to mobilise and manipulate memory in the service of reconciliation, compensation and transitional justice.

Remembering the Revolution: Memory, History, and Nation Making from Independence to the Civil War

In today’s United States, the legacy of the American Revolution looms large. From presidential speeches to bestselling biographies, from conservative politics to school pageants, everybody knows something about the Revolution. Yet what was a messy, protracted, divisive, and destructive war has calcified into a glorified founding moment of the American nation. Disparate events with equally diverse participants have been reduced to a few key scenes and characters, presided over by well-meaning and wise old men. Recollections of the Revolution did not always take today’s form. In this lively collection of essays, historians and literary scholars consider how the first three generations of American citizens interpreted their nation’s origins. The volume introduces readers to a host of individuals and groups both well known and obscure, from Molly Pitcher and “forgotten father” John Dickinson to African American Baptists in Georgia and antebellum pacifists. They show how the memory of the Revolution became politicized early in the nation’s history, as different interests sought to harness its meaning for their own ends. No single faction succeeded, and at the outbreak of the Civil War the American people remained divided over how to remember the Revolution.

Gardens of Fire: An Investigative Memoir

The Black Saturday bushfires of 7 February 2009 were the most catastrophic in Australia’s history. One hundred and seventy three people lost their lives and over two thousand homes were destroyed. Award winning historian and writer Robert Kenny had a sound fire plan and he was prepared. But the reality of the fire was more ferocious and more unpredictable than he could have imagined. By the end of the day, his house and the life contained within were gone. Gardens of Fire extends his experience of being engulfed by flames to an investigation of the human relationship with fire. This extraordinary and compelling history explores European and Aboriginal mythologies of fire along with the pragmatics of the fire in the hearth. This is at once an intimate memoir and a meditative analysis of the reality that, as humans, we are children of fire.

The Soviet Occupation of Germany: Hunger, Mass Violence and the Struggle for Peace, 1945-1947

This is a major new account of the Soviet occupation of postwar Germany and the beginning of the Cold War. Dr Filip Slaveski shows how in the immediate aftermath of war the Red Army command struggled to contain the violence of soldiers against German civilians and, at the same time, feed and rebuild the country. This task was then assumed by the Soviet Military Administration in Germany (SVAG) which was established to impose order on this chaos. Its attempt, however, intensified the battle for resources and power among competing occupation organs, especially SVAG and the army, which spilled over from threats and sabotage into fighting and shootouts in the streets. At times, such conflicts threatened to paralyse occupation governance, leaving armed troops, liberated POWs and slave labourers free to roam. SVAG’s successes in reducing the violence and reconstructing eastern Germany were a remarkable achievement in the chaotic aftermath of war. The book has been described by leading historians as a ‘landmark in the history of WWII and its aftermath’. It has been listed in the Times Higher Education’s Books of 2013 (UK), ‘where the year’s best reads for work and pleasure [are] chosen by scholars and senior figures in the sector’.

Australia Between Empires: The Life of Percy Spender

Part biography, part transnational history, this study details the life and career of Percy Spender, one of Australia's most prominent twentieth-century political figures.

Becoming African Americans: Black Public Life in Harlem, 1919–1939

In 2000, the United States census allowed respondents for the first time to tick a box marked “African American” in the race category. The new option marked official recognition of a term that had been gaining currency for some decades. Africa has always played a role in black identity, but it was in the tumultuous period between the two world wars that black Americans first began to embrace a modern African American identity. Following the great migration of black southerners to northern cities after World War I, the search for roots and for meaningful affiliations became subjects of debate and display in a growing black public sphere. Throwing off the legacy of slavery and segregation, black intellectuals, activists, and organizations sought a prouder past in ancient Egypt and forged links to contemporary Africa. In plays, pageants, dance, music, film, literature, and the visual arts, they aimed to give stature and solidity to the American black community through a new awareness of the African past and the international black world. Their consciousness of a dual identity anticipated the hyphenated identities of new immigrants in the years after World War II, and an emerging sense of what it means to be a modern American.

Make It Australian: The APG, The Pram Factory and New Wave Theatre

The Australian Performing Group, or APG, helped to bring about a profound change in Australian theatre and nurtured the talents of a generation of writers and performers who have become household names. This title gives an outsiders view of this influential group and the social, political and cultural context in which it operated.

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